From Dr. James White and the aomin.org blog…

Session XXV: Rule IV of the Ten Rules Concerning Prohibited Books Drawn Up by The Fathers Chosen by the Council of Trent and Approved by Pope Pius: Since it is clear from experience that if the Sacred Books are permitted everywhere and without discrimination in the vernacular, there will by reason of the boldness of men arise therefrom more harm than good, the matter is in this respect left to the judgment of the bishop or inquisitor, who may with the advice of the pastor or confessor permit the reading of the Sacred Books translated into the vernacular by Catholic authors to those who they know will derive from such reading no harm but rather an increase of faith and piety, which permission they must have in writing. Those, however, who presume to read or possess them without such permission may not receive absolution from their sins till they have handed over to the ordinary. Bookdealers who sell or in any way supply Bibles written in the vernacular to anyone who has not this permission, shall lose the price of the books, which is to be applied by the bishop to pious purposes, and in keeping with the nature of the crime they shall be subject to other penalties which are left to the judgment of the same bishop. Regulars who have not the permission of their superiors may not read or purchase them. H. J. Schroeder, Canons and Decrees of the Council of Trent: Original Text with English Translation (St. Louis: B. Herder Book Co., 1955), p. 274-75. 

David King posted this as a reminder to our Roman Catholic friends who like to argue Scripture that they have not always been given that freedom—I wonder how many of them have written permission from their "bishop of inquisitor, pastor or confessor" to own and read the sacred scriptures? Oh, I know—it's just the 2,000 year old church, never changing!

To the best of my knowledge, Trent still remains the "official" position of the Roman Catholic Church. What we, as confessing Protestants, take for granted (i.e., having the scriptures to read and study) is such a tightly controlled thing in the RCC. You cannot own a bible in the vernacular unless it has the approval of Rome. Interesting…

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